Author Topic: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne  (Read 8870 times)

[SJ]Andy Fuller

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #75 on: April 02, 2009, 07:10:52 am »
Although a bit harsh, if he did lie, a DQ is the only way I can see fit. Lying to the FIA about what happened is the same as cheating and would make him look very untrustworthy. This is something that could haunt him with the FIA in the future if he is called for more hearings on other things-they will always have doubt in what he is saying.

[SJ]Jarkko Rantajoki

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #76 on: April 02, 2009, 09:37:22 am »
Well, its official now.. Hamilton Disqualified.. And Trulli got back his 3rd position!

Quote from: autosport
A statement issued by the stewards said: "The Stewards having considered the new elements presented to them from the 2009 Australian Formula One Grand Prix, consider that driver No 1 Lewis Hamilton and the competitor Vodafone McLaren Mercedes acted in a manner prejudicial to the conduct of the event by providing evidence deliberately misleading to the Stewards at the hearing on Sunday 29th March 2009, a breach of Article 151c of the International Sporting Code.

"Under Article 158 of the International Sporting Code the driver No 1 Lewis Hamilton and the competitor Vodafone McLaren Mercedes are excluded from the race classification for the 2009 Australian Grand Prix and the classification is amended accordingly."


[SJ]Kristof Huyck

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #77 on: April 02, 2009, 09:53:50 am »
lol Nice one, Lewis just had to be happy with 4th which was already a very good result with the McLaren. I really didn't thought the FIA would dare to make this move.

[SJ]Jarkko Rantajoki

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #78 on: April 02, 2009, 02:02:27 pm »
I think they had to do it tbh.. to make a good example what happens if you lie and try to effect stewards decision that way.

[SJ]Sh1te R1der

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #79 on: April 02, 2009, 02:57:55 pm »
Well, it just wouldn't be F1 without a little bit of this and that, would it? :rotfl: I don't believe it was as clear-cut as has been suggested, and would place more blame at McLaren's door, rather than on Hamilton; let's not kid ourselves to think that he had not been fully briefed by one of McLaren's legal team, prior to going to the stewards meeting.  However, I do believe that there should be a penalty for the conduct of McLaren, although I think it is certainly harsh; but then, I thought Trulli's penalty was harsh in the first place, so perhaps justice has been done.  Is a pity, because Hamilton's drive was scintillating (as was Trulli's), and it is now all for nothing.

 


[SJ]Jarkko Rantajoki

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #80 on: April 02, 2009, 06:53:29 pm »
I don't believe it was as clear-cut as has been suggested
 


Whats not clear to you m8? They asked from Hamilton did he deliberately let Trulli pass, he said no. Radio traffic clearly proves that he did..
So he put the blame on Trulli, instead of admitting he let Trulli by.. pretty clear imo.
lol

[SJ]Jarkko Rantajoki

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #81 on: April 02, 2009, 06:57:02 pm »

[SJ]Sh1te R1der

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #82 on: April 04, 2009, 03:03:46 pm »
I don't believe it was as clear-cut as has been suggested
 


Whats not clear to you m8? They asked from Hamilton did he deliberately let Trulli pass, he said no. Radio traffic clearly proves that he did..
So he put the blame on Trulli, instead of admitting he let Trulli by.. pretty clear imo.
lol

Sorry... didn't see this until now.  As I said in my post, my instinct was that this sorry affair was initiated by the team, and not by Hamilton.  This has been borne out by subsequent developments, and we were treated to the unusual sight of contrition by Hamilton, and dare I suggest humility!  The Mclaren official who took the fall was clearly a patsy IMO, and I reckon that the order to deny the conversation came from the very top (Whitmarsh?).  I do not consider that Hamilton had any say in the matter, and was simply ordered to sing from the same hymn-sheet.

As for the basis of the decision not to come clean; I cannot understand why they didn't just admit the fact that Hamilton allowed Trulli to re-pass, particularly as he had said as much to the BBC before heading off to the stewards office.  Having read the transcript of the conversation, it is clear that there was a discussion as to the legality of the pass; in my opinion, this is due to the problems encountered after Spa last year, and McLaren are perhaps a little paranoid.  McLaren stated that they were on the blower to the race director, and that Hamilton should allow Trulli to re-pass, although Hamilton clearly did not agree with this interpretation. 

McLaren had a ready-made excuse for slowing to allow Trulli to pass, in that they were unable to obtain a definitive judgement on the legality of the overtake, and therefore wanted to protect their 4th place, with a view to arguing the case after the race.  Why they did not argue this in the stewards room is a mystery to me, as if they had, bearing in mind the race effectively finished under the safety car, Hamilton and Trulli's positions could have been reversed, assuming that the stewards accepted Trulli was not given a choice other than to pass Hamilton.

It has not been McLaren's finest hour; however, I would argue that Hamilton's unreserved apology represents the finest off-track moment of his career.  I am sure people would argue that he could have blown the whistle, but under pressure form the team, I do not think he had a choice.  Let us not forget that, whether we like it or not, cheating is all part of the game of F1, and many times teams and drivers have been found-out.  Consider the issue of Ferrari's extending front-wing of a few seasons ago; it had clearly been engineered to extend, totally contrary to the rules.  The antics of Schumacher, attempting to drive Villeneuve off track, or blocking the Monaco track at the end of qualifying are just two further examples of teams and drivers trying to cheat an advantage.

[SJ]2shedz

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #83 on: April 04, 2009, 03:48:35 pm »
Hamilton pissed me off last year when he compared himself to Schumaker, the arrogant little shit, but i stand corrected, he is like  Schumaker, not adverse to a little cheating
:ted:

[SJ]Jarkko Rantajoki

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #84 on: April 04, 2009, 04:10:48 pm »
I got my channel card one hour before Qualify.. then shoved the card in.. searched for new channels and waited if it will work in time.. it didnt... i waited.. waited more.. then was the rerun.. still didnt work.. then i took the card out and put it in the other way this time and it tadaa.. it worked..
lol

Im usually decently technically able.. what a brainfart eh?
On my defence, it kinda goes in "the wrong way".. the chip facing down so thats why i didnt even think it could be wrong at first..

Well.. gonna see F1 live from now on.. from the TV... without any trouble!
woot!

[SJ]CasparGTL

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Re: Formula 1 2009 Melbourne
« Reply #85 on: April 04, 2009, 05:08:43 pm »
I don't believe it was as clear-cut as has been suggested
 


Whats not clear to you m8? They asked from Hamilton did he deliberately let Trulli pass, he said no. Radio traffic clearly proves that he did..
So he put the blame on Trulli, instead of admitting he let Trulli by.. pretty clear imo.
lol

Sorry... didn't see this until now.  As I said in my post, my instinct was that this sorry affair was initiated by the team, and not by Hamilton.  This has been borne out by subsequent developments, and we were treated to the unusual sight of contrition by Hamilton, and dare I suggest humility!  The Mclaren official who took the fall was clearly a patsy IMO, and I reckon that the order to deny the conversation came from the very top (Whitmarsh?).  I do not consider that Hamilton had any say in the matter, and was simply ordered to sing from the same hymn-sheet.

As for the basis of the decision not to come clean; I cannot understand why they didn't just admit the fact that Hamilton allowed Trulli to re-pass, particularly as he had said as much to the BBC before heading off to the stewards office.  Having read the transcript of the conversation, it is clear that there was a discussion as to the legality of the pass; in my opinion, this is due to the problems encountered after Spa last year, and McLaren are perhaps a little paranoid.  McLaren stated that they were on the blower to the race director, and that Hamilton should allow Trulli to re-pass, although Hamilton clearly did not agree with this interpretation. 

McLaren had a ready-made excuse for slowing to allow Trulli to pass, in that they were unable to obtain a definitive judgement on the legality of the overtake, and therefore wanted to protect their 4th place, with a view to arguing the case after the race.  Why they did not argue this in the stewards room is a mystery to me, as if they had, bearing in mind the race effectively finished under the safety car, Hamilton and Trulli's positions could have been reversed, assuming that the stewards accepted Trulli was not given a choice other than to pass Hamilton.

It has not been McLaren's finest hour; however, I would argue that Hamilton's unreserved apology represents the finest off-track moment of his career.  I am sure people would argue that he could have blown the whistle, but under pressure form the team, I do not think he had a choice.  Let us not forget that, whether we like it or not, cheating is all part of the game of F1, and many times teams and drivers have been found-out.  Consider the issue of Ferrari's extending front-wing of a few seasons ago; it had clearly been engineered to extend, totally contrary to the rules.  The antics of Schumacher, attempting to drive Villeneuve off track, or blocking the Monaco track at the end of qualifying are just two further examples of teams and drivers trying to cheat an advantage.


The season is open!   lol chocks away  lol chocks away  lol

Have fun debating guys! Can't wait for the post race versions.  :hats off: